South Sudan unhappy with US support for sanctions

March 8, 2015 (JUBA)- South Sudanese presidency described as “extremely disappointing” the decision of the United States for the imposition of the United Nations sanctions against individual perceived to blocking attempts to bring peaceful settlement to the conflict.

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Security Council votes unanimously, creating a system to impose sanctions on those blocking peace in South Sudan (Photo UN/Devra Berkowitz)

The Minister in the Office of the President Awan Guol Riak told a social gathering on Sunday that government was surprised and unhappy to realise that the United States, which supported the birth of the new nation, has turned her back by leading efforts to impose sanctions against the young nation and its leadership.

“It is extremely disappointing that not just a friend but someone who has always been on our side all along can make such an unfortunate U-turn and started to lead the process to bring down all that has been achieved”, Riak explained while stressing that the government remains committed to pursuing peace to the country.

Riak, however, said the Juba government remains committed towards pursuing peace.

The minister didn’t elaborate on American efforts but the UN sanctions Resolution 2206 was drafted and submitted to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) by Washington’s ambassador to the world body, Samantha Power.

In a statement issued on Friday after the collapse of the talks, the State Department condemned the lack of political leadership to resolve the conflict and warned against further fighting.

“We will ensure that those who commit acts of violence—or otherwise undermine efforts toward peace—are held accountable,” partly read the 6 March statement.

The statement further said that Washington looks forward to the UN Security Council’s planned review of the situation, as called for by Resolution 2206.

“We must speak with one voice, making clear our collective resolve to assist the South Sudanese people in ending this tragedy”.

Tens of thousands of people have been killed and nearly two million displaced since violence broke out in the country in 2013, leaving over 2.5 million people at risk of famine.

(ST)